Hollings Center Regional Policy Dialogues cover consequential and challenging topics that link Muslim-majority nations and the United States. Dialogues center on subjects that are critically relevant yet under-discussed in the public sphere. Participants have included a broad spectrum of government officials, experts on domestic and foreign policy, academics, economists, civil society leaders and practitioners.

 

Dialogues

Central Asia’s Regional Challenges

Central Asia is the region that isn’t exactly a region. The republics trade globally, but relatively little with one another. Their border and customs policies remain highly dysfunctional despite well‐meaning international aid programs. And much of the new infrastructure in the region has developed to serve national territory, rather than to better connect states to one another. Central…

Iraq’s Foreign Policy and Economic Challenges

Iraq is in a critical stage of political and economic development, and its growing potential as a regional lynchpin runs alongside great domestic uncertainty, divisions and soul-searching about where the country is headed. Where is Iraq headed as a nation, and what can next-generation Iraqi leaders do to bridge regional and sectarian divisions?  A young…

Foreign Policy and Competing Mediation in the Middle East and Central Asia

July 2012 The political upheavals in the Middle East have shifted the foreign policy landscape in the region.  States like Turkey, Qatar and Saudi Arabia are implementing assertive foreign policies in a region that was arguably dominated for decades by U.S. foreign policy. What comparative advantages do aspiring regional powers have?  Will they compete with…

The Economies of the Arab Spring

October 2011 Until recently, the economic dimensions of the Arab Spring have played second fiddle to high-order political issues.  Policymakers and pundits have focused much more on the posturing of the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) in Egypt or on debating whether an Nahda will upend the secular order in Tunisia.  Less attention…

Fundamentals of Governance in Afghanistan

June 2009 Afghanistan’s 2004 Constitution revived a system of highly centralized government with a strong presidency.  Six years later, it is apparent that this arrangement is failing on many counts. The Hollings Center for International Dialogue and the American Institute of Afghanistan Studies (AIAS) convened pre-eminent experts from Afghanistan, Europe, Turkey, and the United States…

Afghanistan’s Other Neighbors: Iran, Central Asia and China

July 2008 This dialogue conference focused on Afghanistan’s significant economic, cultural, and political relationships with its neighbors in the region beyond Pakistan.  Scholars, experts, and policy professionals from Afghanistan, the Central Asian Republics, the European Union, Turkey and the United States addressed Afghanistan’s impact on its neighbors, the significance of trans-national ethnicities and the effects…

Iraq: Unity and Diversity (October 2007)

Deep sectarian divides and different visions for Iraq’s future continue to widen rifts within Iraqi society and make advances in governance, economic progress, and stability all the more fragile.  Participants discussed Iraqi national identity, the perspective of Iraq’s neighbors, the impact of the current war on domestic politics and economics and the future of Iraq…

The Durand Line: History, Consequences, and Future

July 2007 The Durand Line, the border between Afghanistan and Pakistan, has long been the site of more conflict than cooperation.  This dialogue brought together leading scholars, policy experts, and officials from Afghanistan, Pakistan, the United States and several European countries to focus on the political and legal history of the boundary, its social and…


Video

Political Pluralism in Tunisia: Reconciling Deep Reforms with Stability

On October 9, 2018, the Hollings Center for International Dialogue, in cooperation with partners Solidar Tunisia and the Jasmine Foundation, hosted a regional report launch for its Political Pluralism in the Middle East and North Africa initiative. The following video features the keynote address and highlights of the first panel that morning. Participants include: Moderator:…

Prospects for Political Pluralism in the Middle East and North Africa

On October 9, 2018, the Hollings Center for International Dialogue, in cooperation with partners Solidar Tunisia and the Jasmine Foundation, hosted a regional report launch for its Political Pluralism in the Middle East and North Africa initiative. The following video features the keynote address and highlights of the first panel that morning. Participants include: Keynote…

Desi Indrimayutri & Tina Jamaluddin on U.S.-ASEAN Economic Relations

Desi Indrimayutri & Tina Jamaluddin discuss why the ASEAN region is important to the private sector and U.S. investment success stories. Desi Indrimayutri is the US-ASEAN Business Council’s managing representative in Indonesia and its senior liaison with the Indonesian Government, the ASEAN Secretariat, the U.S. diplomatic presence in Indonesia and other key high-level stakeholders. The…

Courtney Weatherby on Non-traditional Security Issues in Southeast Asia

What are the main non-traditional security issues facing Southeast Asia today, and how can the US play a constructive role in helping countries in this region deal with these issues? Analyst Courtney Weatherby explains. Courtney Weatherby is a research analyst with the Southeast Asia and the Energy, Water, & Sustainability programs at the Stimson Center….

Christine Susanna Tjhin on China’s Engagement in Southeast Asia

What is the nature of China’s engagement in Southeast Asia? Is there a willingness on behalf of China to cooperate with the US on certain areas and issues? Christine Susana Tjhin explains further. Christine Susanna Tjhin is senior researcher at the Department of International Relations, Centre for Strategic and International Studies, Indonesia. She is also…


 

Events & Other Projects